How to spend 48 hours in Tokyo

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How to spend 48 hours in Tokyo

How to spend 48 hours in Tokyo: The very idea of Tokyo one of the most densely packed cities on the planet can be intimidating even before getting off the plane. In reality, however, it is a refreshingly easy city to visit. Despite its salaryman crowds, flashing neon and sprawling train networks, it is a place that thrives on running smoothly and safely. And an added gold star? It’s as clean as a city can possibly be. We take you for  48 hours on the path. Betting you do not feel bored a second.

How to spend 48 hours in Tokyo


Day 1

MORNING

Start the day at Tokyo’s oldest Buddhist temple Sensoji, located in the eastern Asakusa district. Wander beneath large red gates, through a seasonal market and past tiered temple roofs before copying locals as they clap hands, toss coins and burn incense at the main altar.  For lunch, head to Sometaro, an understated restaurant in an old wooden house where shoes are slipped off at the door and okonomiyaki (savory pancakes) are cooked at low tables with in-built hot plates.

 

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AFTERNOON

After lunch, take a leisurely 20-minute stroll (or five-minute train hop) across the Sumida River in the direction of one of the city’s most famed attractions of Tokyo Skytree, the world’s tallest free-standing broadcast tower. Head up to one of two observation decks in ear-popping lifts to take in a bird’s eye view of Tokyo’s urban sprawl (keeping an eye out for the sight of Mount Fuji in the distance, on a clear day).

To explore Tokyo’s greener side, head next to Ueno Park. The park which dates back to the 19th century comes to life in spring, and more than 1,000 cherry trees burst into pink bloom. It’s also a perfect one-stop culture shop, as it’s home to a string of museums (Tokyo National Museum among them) plus temples, shrines, lotus ponds, and even a zoo with celebrity panda residents.

LATE

A visit to Tokyo is incomplete without at least one sunset cocktail in a skyscraper: head to the 52nd floor New York Bar at the Park Hyatt in Shinjuku while enjoying high-quality cocktails against a backdrop of live jazz.

 

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Come back down to earth with a pleasant bump by heading for dinner at dining bar Kitsune is a true hidden gem for adults. Located in the basement of the building between Shibuya and Ebisu, Kitsune is one of the most fashionable places to dine in Tokyo. Serving creative Sushi dish and variety of Sushi with 360° island kitchen. Parties and events are often held here, yet if you wish to dine quietly, there are several private rooms.

 

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Shibuya Crossing busiest intersection its heavy traffic and inundation of advertising have led to it being compared to the Times Square intersection in New York City and Piccadilly Circus intersection in London. Shibuya Crossing is the world’s busiest pedestrian crossing, with as many as 2,500 people crossing at a time

Day 2

 

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MORNING

Keen to spot some future fashion trends? Head to Harajuku and disappear among the colorfully dressed teen tribes, while exploring the fashion boutiques and waffle cafés that line bustling Takeshita Dori street. Then reclaim a sense of inner calm by following a wide forest-lined park just behind the station that leads to one of Tokyo’s most serene spots: Meiji Jingu, an elegant Shinto shrine, complete with tall wooden torii gates and tree-filled courtyards. A walking path cuts through the trees, leading to the shrine in the center. Walking along this misty trail will make you forget you’re in the middle of two of Tokyo’s busiest districts.

 

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AFTERNOON

Refuel alongside fashionable locals with lunch at Maisen, a short walk from Harajuku. Here, delicious mouth-melting tonkatsu breaded pork cutlets steal the show, served up in the atmospheric setting of a former public bathhouse. Shopping should be next on the list: wander up nearby Omotesando, an elegant sloping boulevard lined with architect-designed fashion flagships, from the glass bubble-esque façade of the Herzog & de Meuron-designed Prada building to the minimalist tree-inspired form of the Tod’s tower by Toyo Ito.

 

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Pause for a breather at the Kengo Kuma-designed Nezu Museum, walk along with its serene bamboo and stone entry path before exploring its Japanese heritage treasures and wander among its exquisitely maintained gardens, complete with ponds and teahouses.

 

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LATE

Escape the crowds for an intimate and authentic Japanese meal at Rakushokushu Maru. The basement restaurant has an elegant contemporary décor but the real scene-stealer is the menu, showcasing a seasonal modern take on Kyoto’s traditional kaiseki banquet-style cuisine.

In JapanAirbnb is often significantly cheaper than staying in a hotel, especially with multiple guests. Staying in a house or apartment also gives you a more “local” experience.  

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